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January 03, 2007

Rube the Tube

Rolling_rock_beer Created by “woollydoozer”, here’s the amazing beer-pouring Rube Goldberg contraption

A simple recipe for nettle beer

Beers I have consumed - all 437 of them

Goodbye barkeep - The Asahi beer dispenser

The other day my friends and I were sitting around knocking back a few beers when we came upon a question we realized only you can answer: Why is there a "33" on Rolling Rock beer labels? We all know it's brewed from pure artesian well water in the glass-lined tanks of Latrobe, Pennsylvania, hometown of Arnold Palmer and all that. But what does the number mean?

The worst and best beers in Asia

/// Add it to your del.icio.us /// A Huge Depository of Unusual Beer Links And Other Alcoholic Beverages Here

January 3, 2007 in Beverages - Beer | Permalink

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Comments

this post would've rocked with nettle beer alone! awesome!

Posted by: Rev. Qelqoth at Jan 4, 2007 12:08:06 AM

Ok, I know that you don't know me, but I noticed that you have tried many of the Baltika line. Give Baltika #9 a shot, it was definitely my favorite both in Russia and at home. Also, you may want to try Fin Du Monde by Unibroue, a wonderful belgian trippel.

Posted by: Adam Coddington at Jan 5, 2007 7:35:25 AM

My hero

Posted by: Baby Jebus at Jan 5, 2007 8:57:03 AM


Brew low cost beer. The amount of time you spend on brewing beer makes the small difference in cost between "just OK"

ingredients and top quality ingredients a minor point. Either way, the cost of brewing a 5 gallon batch is much cheaper

than buying a couple of cases of beer in the store.

Beer is made of cheap ingredients, so it doesn't hurt to buy the best. Surprisingly, the cheapest way to brew beer gives

you the best results: all grain brewing is the cheapest way to brew when grain is bought in bulk.

You do need a grain mill and a mash tun, so there is a small investment in equipment needed. But you should be able to

brew excellent quality beer for less than $2 per gallon, and you could brew a mild ale for as little as $1 per gallon, or

less than 10 cents per bottle (one gallon is about 10-1/2 12oz bottles). Most of my pilsners are about $1.50 a gallon

brews.

Other ways to reduce the cost of your beer are by growing your own hops and reusing yeast from the fermenter. Easy to do,

and it means that I don't have to buy yeast more than once every half year or so. The hops should last e through most of

the winter brews. So all you need is grain, which is about $0.70 per pound in a bulk purchase (much of the cost is in

shipping).

Beer Brewing Equipment Basic, simple, cheap equipment that gets the job done. Sometimes it adds to the challenge. But

through the mystique of brewing and remember that illiterate alewives brewed for centuries using tried and true recipes

and procedures before the dawn of kegerators, ph meters or hydrometers.

Beer Keg Brewing. After using bottles for years, you can jump to the corny keg (Cornelius keg). This is an important step

because it makes brewing so much easier. You can still bottle, but just a few bottles per batch, and use a corny keg to

fill the bottles. You can use corny kegs as secondary fermenting vessels. You can try out method where you leave the beer

in the primary for about two weeks until it clears nicely, and then upi carefully siphon it over to a corny, avoiding

transferring any trub.

Posted by: beer at Mar 2, 2007 7:20:12 PM


Brew low cost beer. The amount of time you spend on brewing beer makes the small difference in cost between "just OK"

ingredients and top quality ingredients a minor point. Either way, the cost of brewing a 5 gallon batch is much cheaper

than buying a couple of cases of beer in the store.

Beer is made of cheap ingredients, so it doesn't hurt to buy the best. Surprisingly, the cheapest way to brew beer gives

you the best results: all grain brewing is the cheapest way to brew when grain is bought in bulk.

You do need a grain mill and a mash tun, so there is a small investment in equipment needed. But you should be able to

brew excellent quality beer for less than $2 per gallon, and you could brew a mild ale for as little as $1 per gallon, or

less than 10 cents per bottle (one gallon is about 10-1/2 12oz bottles). Most of my pilsners are about $1.50 a gallon

brews.

Other ways to reduce the cost of your beer are by growing your own hops and reusing yeast from the fermenter. Easy to do,

and it means that I don't have to buy yeast more than once every half year or so. The hops should last e through most of

the winter brews. So all you need is grain, which is about $0.70 per pound in a bulk purchase (much of the cost is in

shipping).

Beer Brewing Equipment Basic, simple, cheap equipment that gets the job done. Sometimes it adds to the challenge. But

through the mystique of brewing and remember that illiterate alewives brewed for centuries using tried and true recipes

and procedures before the dawn of kegerators, ph meters or hydrometers.

Beer Keg Brewing. After using bottles for years, you can jump to the corny keg (Cornelius keg). This is an important step

because it makes brewing so much easier. You can still bottle, but just a few bottles per batch, and use a corny keg to

fill the bottles. You can use corny kegs as secondary fermenting vessels. You can try out method where you leave the beer

in the primary for about two weeks until it clears nicely, and then upi carefully siphon it over to a corny, avoiding

transferring any trub.

Posted by: beer at Mar 3, 2007 4:46:05 AM

It looks like the link above for the Rolling Rock discussion on the "33" is dead. Here is another one that discusses the theories behind the label: http://www.beer-faq.com/beer-history/rolling-rock-label-33/

Posted by: Beer Answer Guy at Dec 2, 2007 3:52:27 AM